Audio cassette tapes in the classroom

Last week I posted a message about the utilization of new media on primary/elementary schools. I then thought of some reasons why the usage of internet and computers is still relatively small. After speaking with some teachers, I found out there are at least two other good reasons:

1) Money. Let’s face it, although governments all over the world claim that they want to invest more in education, most schools just don’t have the money for computers. Often schools rely on volunteers that can organise IT related matters for them.

2) Change can be hard. A lot of teachers have been doing their own ‘thing’ for years, repeating the same stuff every schoolyear. They feel comfortable with it, and also the lack of time prevents them from working with computers and discovering ‘new media’.

A great example of these reasons in real life is the usage of audio cassette tapes in classrooms. Yes, audio cassette tapes, they are still being used!  While most consumers threw out their cassette recorders somewhere in the late Eighties, schools and teachers are still relying on them heavily.

Is there no money for cd players, or is it that teachers don’t know how cd or mp3 players work? Didn’t anyone explain them what streaming media is? Or aren’t new teachers trained in these things on graduate schools and universities?

 

I really don’t know what the reason is. What I do know by now, is where the term oldschool comes from 😉

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